The head of the Cherokee nation says it’s time for Jeep to stop using the name of the tribe


The head of the Cherokee nation says it’s time for Jeep to stop using the name of the tribe


For the first time, the Cherokee Nation is asking Jeep to change the name of its Cherokee and Grand Cherokee vehicles. “I’m sure it comes from a well-intended place, but it doesn’t honor us by having our name sealed on the side of the car,” said Chuck Hoskin, Jr., chief chief of the Cherokee Nation, Car and Driver in a written statement. in response to our request for comment on this matter. “The best way to honor us is to learn about our sovereign government, our role in this country, our history, culture and language, and to have a meaningful dialogue with federally recognized tribes about cultural adequacy. . “Jeep has been making cars that have been named after the Cherokee nation for more than 45 years. At the time, the company several times defended its decision to use the name of the Indian nation on its cars. In the last eight years, since the re-introduction of the Cherokee nameplate to the US market in 2013, the Cherokee Nation has gone to r ecord, but has never explicitly said that Jeep should change car names. Now that Jeep is preparing to launch the new generation Grand Cherokee against the background of significant changes in the world of sports, that has changed. In a statement, Chief Hoskin referred to the incorporation of concepts of racial justice after the Black Lives Matter protests last summer, as well as to these sports stories. In December, the Cleveland Major League Baseball team decided to cancel its nickname and mascot. Last July, the NFL team in Washington, D.C., announced that it would stop using a nickname that had long been considered a racial curse. The team spent last season known only as the Washington Football Team. Both changes were long awaited. The National Congress of American Indians began working to address Native American paintings in 1968. In 2005, the National College Athletic Association began banning universities and colleges from displaying hostile or abusive nicknames, mascots, or images. Last spring, the dairy company Land O ‘Lakes removed an image of an Indian woman that it used on its packaging. “I think we are in this country today, where it is time for both corporations and team sports to stop using Native American names, pictures and mascots from their products, team jerseys and sports in general,” Chief Hoskin said in a statement. According to Amanda Cobb-Greetham, a professor at the University of Oklahoma and director of the Center for National Nations, the use of native images in sports and popular culture began at the turn of the 20th century. At the time, less than 300,000 Native Americans lived in the United States. “Because of the prevailing ideology that Indigenous people will eventually disappear … Native Americans have become part of the national mythology of the borders and the West and the settlement of America,” said Cobb-Greetham. “And that’s when you suddenly have Native American mascots and products, cultural kitsch. That includes the names of cars. ”Jeep first used the name Cherokee in a 1974 two-door car (one of the available equipment was called the Cherokee Chief). Since then, it has consistently produced cars called the Cherokee, but from 2002 to 2013, these cars were known in the North American market as the Liberty. = When Jeep brought the Cherokee name back to the United States in 2013, a Cherokee Nation spokesman told the New York Times: “We encouraged and applauded schools and universities for abandoning offensive mascots,” but that “institutionally the tribe has no attitude. “The same story remarked that Cherokee Nation was not consulted before Jeep brought the nameplate back to the US. The Grand Cherokee is Jeep’s best-selling car and the Cherokee is its third best-selling model. 40% of Jeep’s total sales in 2020. Since that year, Jeep has been using Mojave for some Gladiator trucks. The Fort Mojave Reservation covers parts of Arizona, California and Nevada near the Mojave Desert. Last June, as protests against George Floyd’s death sparked discussions about racial justice, Chief Hoskin told the Wall Street Journal: “We hope the movement continues to use names and depictions of tribes or sell products without our consent. Much better cooperative efforts than adversarial ones. “The most recognized example of this type of effort is probably the agreement between Florida State University and the Seminole tribe in Florida. Includes a scholarship program for students from the reservation. In 2005, the Seminole tribe issued a resolution calling for its relationship with the school. “Historic partnership.” The Cherokee people said they had no such relationship with the Jeep. Jeep ResponseTold calls on Chief Hoskin to end the use of the Cherokee name on his cars, Jeep said in a statement: . More than ever, we are committed to a respectful and open dialogue with Cherokee Chief of Staff Chuck Hoskin, Jr. “But Cobb-Greetham, a member of the Chickasaw Nation and emphasizing the sovereignty of the Cherokee people in choosing how to respond to the use of their own name, has a different view:” If you want to appreciate someone, give them a prize. If you want to name a product after them, you are selling it. A Cherokee Nation official said that Jeep representatives called Chief Hoskin earlier this month, but the nation’s attitude to the use of the Jeep name has not changed.

For the first time, the Cherokee Nation is asking Jeep to change the name of its Cherokee and Grand Cherokee vehicles.

“I’m sure it comes from a place that’s well-intentioned, but it doesn’t honor us to have our name pasted on the side of the car.” Chuck Hoskin, Jr.said the chief chief of the Cherokee Nation Car and driver in a written statement responding to our request for comment on the issue. “The best way to honor us is to learn about our sovereign government, our role in this country, our history, culture and language, and to have a meaningful dialogue with federally recognized tribes about cultural adequacy.”

cherokee & # x20;  Chief & # x20;  main & chuck & hoskin, & # x20;  jr

JEREMY CHARLES

Chief Chief of the Cherokee Nation Chuck Hoskin, Jr.

Jeep has been making Cherokee Nation cars for over 45 years. At that time, the company noted several times the defense of its decision to use the name of the Indian nation on its cars.

For the last eight years since reintroduction The Cherokee Nation also signed the Cherokee on the US market in 2013, but never explicitly said that the Jeep should change the names of cars.

Now that the Jeep is preparing to launch new generation Grand Cherokee Background significant name changes it has changed in the world of sports.

In a statement, Chief Hoskin referred to mainstreaming concepts of racial justice after the Black Lives Matter protests last summer, as well as these sports stories.

In December, Cleveland Major League Baseball team decided to cancel his nickname and mascot. Last July The NFL team in Washington DC has announced that it will stop using a nickname long considered a racial curse. The team spent last season known only as the Washington Football Team.

dallas football team & # x20;  cowboys & washington # washington & # x20;

Getty ImagesScott Taetsch

Both changes have come a long time. The National Congress of American Indians began work on solving the problems of Native American images in 1968. In 2005 the National College Athletic Association began banning colleges and universities from displaying hostile or offensive nicknames, mascots or pictures. Last spring, a dairy company Land O ‘Lakes deleted the image Native American woman she used on her package.

“I think we are in this country today, where it is time for both corporations and team sports to stop using Native American names, pictures and mascots from their products, team jerseys and sports in general,” Chief Hoskin said in a statement.

According to Amanda Cobb-Greetham, a professor at the University of Oklahoma and director of the School Center for Indigenous Peoples, began using native images in sports and popular culture at the turn of the 20th and 20th centuries.th century. At the time, less than 300,000 Native Americans lived in the United States.

“Because of the prevailing ideology that Native people will eventually disappear … Native Americans have become part of the national mythology of the borders and the West and the settlements of America,” Cobb-Greetham said. “And that’s when you suddenly have Native American mascots and products, cultural kitsch. The names of the cars are part of it. “

Jeep first used the name Cherokee in a two-door car from 1974 (one of the available equipment was called the Cherokee Chief). Since then, it has consistently produced cars called the Cherokee, but from 2002 to 2013, these cars were known in the North American market as the Liberty. =

When Jeep brought the Cherokee name back to the United States in 2013, a Cherokee Nation spokesman said New York Times“We have encouraged and applauded schools and universities for abandoning offensive mascots,” but “institutionally the tribe has no attitude.”

2020â & # x20AC; & # x2122;  jeep & # x00AE;  & # x20;  gladiator & # x20;  mojave

The same story noted that the Cherokee Nation was not consulted before Jeep brought the nameplate back to the United States. The Grand Cherokee is Jeep’s best-selling car and the Cherokee is its third best-selling model.

Together, these vehicles accounted for more than 40% of Jeep’s total sales in 2020. Since the same year, Jeep has been using Gladiator Mojave for some trucks. The Indian tribe of Fort MojaveThe reservation includes parts of Arizona, California and Nevada near the Mojave Desert.

Last June, when protests against George Floyd’s death sparked discussions about racial justice, Chief Hoskin said the Wall Street Journal“We hope that the movement will continue from the use of names and images of tribes or to the sale of products without our consent. We much prefer cooperative efforts to adversarial ones. ”

The most recognized example of this type of effort is probably an agreement between Florida State University and the Seminole Tribe in Florida. Includes a scholarship program for students from the reservation. In 2005 The Seminole Tribe issued a resolution he called her relationship with the school a “historic partnership.” Cherokee Nation said it had no such relationship with Jeep.

brand new # 2021 2021 & # x20;  jeep & # x00AE;  & # x20;  grand & # x20;  cherokee & # x20;  l & # x20;  summit & # x20;  reserve & # x00A0;  exterior & # x20;  grand & # x20;  cherokee & # x20;  badge & # x00A0;  & # x00A0;

Jeep’s Response

Jeep called on Chief Hoskin to end the use of the Cherokee name on his cars, saying: “The names of our vehicles have been carefully selected and promoted over the years in honor and celebration of Native Americans for their nobility, prowess and pride. More than ever, we are committed to a respectful and open dialogue with Cherokee Nation Chief Chuck Hoskin, Jr. “

But Cobb-Greetham, who is a member Chickasaw Nation and emphasizes the sovereignty of the Cherokee people in choosing how to respond to the use of their own name, he takes a different view: “If you want to appreciate someone, give them a prize. If you want to name a product after it, you are selling. “

A Cherokee Nation official said Jeep representatives had telephoned Chief Hoskin earlier this month, but the nation’s stance on the use of the Jeep name had not changed.


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