For novice Thanksgiving chefs, tips for experts on how to avoid disaster


After Christopher Hughey tweeted that he was struggling with his first step of Thanksgiving this year, the advice began to roll. Do not bother. Try “spatchcocking” – the bird’s grill will open. Don’t forget to turn on the oven and expect something to burn. “One extreme is that it will be dry, inedible and rude,” said a Charlotte, North Carolina resident who no longer likes to cook poultry due to fears it won’t happen and sick people. “The other extreme is that we all end up in urgent care.” Health officials are urging Americans to stay home or limit gatherings for Thanksgiving, food experts say novices are nervous about trying the first spread on Turkey Day, they can avoid disaster and keep everyone healthy by following a few basic tips. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also offers advice on how to prevent coronavirus infections at celebrations, including eating out whenever possible, restricting kitchen use, and having food served by only one person. The food itself, experts say, to start well before the big day. Common mistake: Lack of planning so that all meals can be prepared on time. This includes leaving enough time to thaw the turkeys in the refrigerator, where temperatures are low enough to prevent bacteria from multiplying. Because it takes a day to thaw every 4 to 5 pounds, it could take up to several days to size, depending on the turkey. Otherwise, getting a frozen turkey in the oven could make the bird look pretty toasted, but it’s still cold inside. “You’ll basically have turkey ice cream, which may look good but won’t cook,” Frank Proto told the New York Institute of Culinary Education. Once the bird thaws, experts say it prevents any instincts from rinsing it before cooking, which could lead to the spraying of germs. Thorough cooking should kill all germs in Turkey. Making sure the bird is properly cooked – at the strongest part it should be 165 degrees – also means using a meat thermometer. Contrary to the recommendations Hughey has offered many times, experts are not in favor of pop-up thermometers that are stuck in some birds. “These aren’t always effective in determining temperature,” said Angela Shaw, an expert at Iowa State University. expanding food safety. Although it is debated, Shaw also recommends cooking the filling outside of turkey. Otherwise, she said the bird could be caught by bacteria. Getting a filling hot enough to kill all germs could mean burning or drying the turkey. Temperature control can be a problem even after everyone runs out; Experts say leftovers cool down within two hours because bacteria can grow quickly on omitted foods. A dry, boiled bird is a major concern for Celeste Molina, who stays at home with her partner and roommates instead of spending them with her family because of a pandemic. Molina, who works for a screen printing company in Portland, Oregon, knows how bad the first attempts can turn out; Years ago, her aunt burned a Thanksgiving bird. “We got to her house and she says, ‘I’ll just order you, McDonald’s,’ she said. Molina is not afraid of her first turkey, but only in case she and her partner would like to buy a chicken to roast next to him. Lori DeSanti, a real estate agent in Meriden, Connecticut, will also be producing turkeys with her husband for the first time, instead of going to her father or relative at home. DeSanti is not so interested in Turkey – she has never been a big fan – and focuses on pulling out a recipe for stuffing. “That’s what I’m more afraid of destroying,” she said. Planning a backup can be important for another reason this year: Make sure you get the right size bird, as the gathering is expected to be smaller. In suburban Detroit, Robyn Dwoskin plans to get turkey breasts instead of a whole bird for his first attempt to spread Thanksgiving, because it will be just her husband, their daughters and her mother d Turkish breasts in her slow cooker before, but have not yet figured out what to do for Thanksgiving day. “I still deny that I’m actually doing Thanksgiving this year,” said Dwoskin, who owns Back to North Carolina social media, Hughey reconsidering his game plan for the dinner he cooks for his ex-wife and sons. “Honestly, I hate to say it. I’m thinking of cheating, “said Hughey, who owns a medical technology company. “I think my next stop is this place where a fully cooked turkey is cooked.” ___ The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

After Christopher Hughey tweeted that he was struggling with his first step of Thanksgiving this year, the council began to roll.

Salted it. Do not bother. Try “spatchcocking” – the bird’s grill will open. Don’t forget to turn on the oven and expect something to burn.

“One extreme is that it will be dry, inedible and rough,” said a North Carolina resident of Charlotte, who no longer likes to cook poultry for fear of being cooked and sick. “The other extreme is that we all end up in urgent care.”

As health officials urge Americans to stay home or limit Thanksgiving gatherings, food experts say novice chefs nervous about trying the first spread on Turkey Day can prevent disaster and keep everyone healthy by following a few basic tips.

They also offer US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advice on how to prevent coronavirus infections during celebrations, including eating out whenever possible, restricting traffic in the kitchen and only having food served by one person.

As for the food itself, experts say the need to start well before the big day. Common mistake: Lack of planning so that all meals can be prepared on time. This involves allowing sufficient time to thaw the turkeys thawed in steps in the refrigerator where the temperatures are low enough to prevent bacteria from multiplying.

Since it takes a day to thaw every 4 to 5 pounds, it could add up to several days depending on the size of the turkey. Otherwise, getting a frozen turkey in the oven could make the bird look pretty toasted, but it’s still cold inside.

“You’ll basically have turkey ice cream, which may look good but won’t cook,” said Frank Proto of the Culinary Education Institute in New York.

Once a bird is thawed, experts say they resist any instincts to rinse it before cooking, which could result in spraying germs. Thorough cooking should kill all germs in Turkey.

Ensuring that the bird is properly cooked – at the strongest part it should be 165 degrees – also means using a meat thermometer. Contrary to the recommendations many offered to Hughey, experts are not fans of pop-up thermometers that get stuck in some birds.

“These aren’t always effective in determining temperature,” said Angela Shaw, a food safety extension specialist at Iowa State University.

Although it is debated, Shaw also recommends cooking stuffing outside of turkey. Otherwise, she said the bird could be caught by bacteria. Getting a filling hot enough to kill all the bacteria could mean burning or drying the turkey, she said.

Temperature control can be a problem even after everyone runs out; Experts say the remnants of the refrigerator inside two hoursBecause bacteria can grow quickly on foods that are skipped.

The dry, boiled bird is the main concern of Celeste Molina, who stays at home with her partner and roommates, instead of spending it with her family due to a pandemic. Molina, who works for a screen printing company in Portland, Oregon, knows how bad the first attempts can turn out; years ago her aunt burned a Thanksgiving bird.

“We got to her house and she says, ‘I’ll just order you, McDonald’s,’ she said.

Molina is not worried about her first turkey, but she plans in case she and her partner want to buy a chicken to roast next to him.

Lori DeSanti, a real estate agent in Meriden, Connecticut, will also be producing turkeys with her husband for the first time, instead of going to her father’s or relative’s house.

DeSanti is not so interested in Turkey – she has never been a big fan – and focuses on pulling out a recipe for stuffing.

“That’s what I’m more afraid of doom,” she said.

Planning in advance can be important for another reason this year: Make sure you get the right bird, as gatherings are expected to be smaller.

In the suburbs of Detroit, Robyn Dwoskin plans for his first attempt to spread Thanksgiving turkey breasts instead of an entire bird, because it will be just her husband, their daughters and her mother. She was already cooking turkey breasts in her slow cooker, but she hadn’t yet figured out what she would do for Thanksgiving.

“I still deny that I’m doing Thanksgiving this year,” said Dwoskin, who owns a social media engagement company.

After returning to North Carolina, Hughey reconsiders his game plan for the dinner he cooks for his ex-wife and sons.

“Honestly, I hate to say it.” I’m thinking of cheating, “said Hughey, who owns a medical technology company. “I think my next stop is this place where a fully cooked turkey is made.”

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


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